Lessons in This Chapter:

10.1 Introduction to Plants

10.2 Evolution and Classification of Plants

10.3 Plant Responses and Special Adaptations

Notes

Plants! There’s so much to do with this chapter, you might want to stretch it out to 2-3 weeks. Decide which of the many hands-on activities you would like to do and get them started, because some of them may take several days to complete. This would also be a great time to plant some seeds and watch them grow (either outdoors or indoors, depending on the season). You can also visit any gardens, arboretums, or nature centers in your city. Grab a plant identification book and take some hikes in your local parks.

The suggested activity for this chapter is the flower dissection and/or the bean dissection. There are two links below showing how to do the flower dissection – one has printable worksheets with it and the other has better photos showing the process. Do as many of the hands-on activities as you can. We are moving into the animal studies so, unless you want to do dissections, there won’t be many hands-on activities in the next several chapters.

There are also several documentaries that are well worth the time. Look for the BBC series Life at your library (it will be very useful for the next several chapters) and watch the episode “Plants”.

Printables

Plethora Lesson Notes

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Documentaries

  Plant episode

The Secret World of the Plants

What Plants Talk About (PBS Passport required)

How to Grow a Planet (3-part series available on Netflix and Curiosity Stream)

Extension Activities

The activities in this chapter would count towards the following skills:

Forester

Gardener

Botanist

Try some plant identification! This online key is a great place to start with some samples from your yard or a park. If you want to incorporate plant identification into a hike, find a book in your library or at your local park center to help you identify local plants. If you plan to go out on hikes often, you could have your child keep a nature journal, with notes, drawings, and even leaves from what you found on each hike.